White Sands National Park – Clinging to Life

New Mexico

Visited March 2022

This park is a pastel world filled with ethereal light that cascades across pleasant, softest sand. It’s a place of moonscapes and unworldly formations, fit for space movie scenes. The beauty of the sand comes from its composition of selenite micro crystals, refracting light in a myriad of angles. The light splashes gentle colors across the scene, making it a photographer’s paradise.

These dunes cling to life because the water table is shallow enough to hold sand particles together. Dig a few feet down, and let the hole sit awhile, and soon it will be filled with water! This enables wildlife to live in the shadows of the inter-dunal areas.

The sands are always shifting, and so too must the plants. They adapt and traverse by extending their roots, or by building their own rooted platforms, rising up like sentries.

It was surreal to be in this park, in this region of the country, while the word ‘nuclear war’ continues to be bantered around like a ping pong ball whilst Russia devastates Ukraine. This national park exists amidst historic and active military might. White Sands Missile Range, an active military site and home of the detonation of the first nuclear bomb (Trinity), sits adjacent to the north, south, and west. Holloman Air Force Base borders the park to the east. Evidence of military presence surrounding the park is prevalent with signs. Even the road to the park from Alamogordo is subject to closure, at the directives of the military as they actively test missiles in the area and must occasionally close the road for safety concerns.

The environment is as imposing as the military presence. Rainfall in the area averages less than 12 inches per year, and the temperatures frequently exceed 100°F in summer. It is a remote location, bounded on the west and east by mountains of the basin and range formation. Life still clings, despite all hardship, despite onslaught, despite the unfairness of the situation. Life continues, because it is meant to do nothing less.

Junior Ranger Badge:

  • Safety
  • Flora and Fauna
  • Food Chain
  • Geology and Topography

This is a family-oriented park, there are not a lot of trails, so hike all that you are able. With the abundance of visitors during spring break, the park is very busy. Be sure to watch younger children closely in the parking lot and along the roadways.  There is a handicap accessible boardwalk trail, with some excellent views of the dunes. Be sure to take a guided nature walk. See the ranger station for schedules.

Extra Tips:

A visit to this national park is not complete without an attempt to sled the dunes. The gift shop sells sleds and wax. However, on busy days, many people may have an extra sled or two. If you see someone leaving, offer to purchase a used sled from them. On the flip side, if you won’t be using yours again, be sure to pass it along to someone else. There is no ‘best’ place to sled but avoid trampling the plant life as they live precarious existence.

Dog poop in a park equals YUCK! This is one of few national parks that allow you to bring your dog. PLEASE PICK UP AFTER YOUR PETS. We saw entirely too much dog waste, don’t ruin the experience or the privilege for others.

Be respectful of others. This is a national park, reduce your noise level by not blaring your music or imposing on others by flying your drone. But really, don’t ruin the experience for others.

Stay to watch the sunset, but be mindful of park hours. Park rangers shouldn’t have to round up visitors at closing time. When the gate closes, it is locked for the night.

Remember:

This National Park is located in a remote area of New Mexico. The closest town is Alamogordo. Be prepared with all items that you will need to enjoy a full day including plenty of water to stay hydrated, sunscreen, and snack/food items. Be prepared to vacuum out your vehicle as the tiny crystals find their way into everything.

Where to Eat:

The gift shop provides snack, and convenience store style items. Your best bet is to pack your lunch prior to visiting, and picnic in the park. If you would rather have a sit-down meal, the town of Alamogordo offers plenty of dining options.

When to Go:

A highly visited site, the sheer number of people enjoying the sand can feel overwhelming if you are one to visit our parks for the peaceful interaction with the natural world. Don’t be dissuaded, just walk a bit further out and you may find the perfect opportunity for a sunset picture of universal delight. Visiting in the less busy season of summer or winter, instead of spring break, might be a better opportunity for un-intruded peace.

Where to Stay:

Back country camping is prohibited, at the time of this posting, due to rehabilitation efforts. There are some excellent campgrounds in the area to enjoy, and due to the basin and range topography, tent camping is comfortable during most of the year. For cooler months, try Oliver Lee State Park which offers some wonderful hiking trails. In the warmer months, the Lincoln National Forest offers several campgrounds in the high mountains.

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